New Hampshire Snowmobile Insurance

How to Find New Hampshire Snowmobile Insurance

Find the right snowmobile insurance policy for you.

While the Granite State enjoys warm summers, you should probably be a cold weather lover to stick around for the winter. The state turns into a literal winter wonderland each season, receiving anywhere from 3 to 5 feet of snow. Residents are natural outdoor enthusiasts and that love for the wild outdoors doesn’t stop with a little snowfall. 

Instead, residents suit up and take to the snowmobile trails. In fact, the state has almost 7,000 miles of snowmobile trails. Hitting the powder can be exhilarating but it’s also dangerous. Snowmobile accidents can lead to vehicle damage, injuries, and even death. While insurance isn’t required by law to operate a snowmobile, it’s a good idea to have a means of compensation if you hit a stump hidden by the snow.

Use our independent agent matching system to find the best insurance plan in your area. You tell us what you’re looking for, and our technology will recommend the best agents for you. Any information you provide will be sent to only the agents you pick. We do not sell to third parties.

State Snowmobiling Laws

  • All users must register snowmobiles with the Department of Fish and Game.
  • All drivers and passengers younger than 17 must wear a helmet.
  • When public trails are open, signs are posted. If you don’t see a sign, the trail is closed.
  • At trail junctions, the speed limit is 10 mph.
  • Speed limit on trails is 45 mph unless posted otherwise.
  • Registrations fees are as follows:
    • Resident club member: $64
    • Resident non-club member: $94
    • Nonresident club member: $84
    • Nonresident non-club member: $114

Do I Need New Hampshire Snowmobile Insurance?

If you ride without insurance, you won’t face legal repercussions unless you cause an accident. Snowmobile laws are similar to the state’s auto insurance requirements. Rather than force residents to purchase insurance, you’re fine to drive uninsured, but if you cause an accident, you’re financially responsible for all damages and injuries. While no one ever anticipates causing an accident, accidents do occur and the consequences can have long-lasting effects.

In addition to being severely injured and/or your snowmobile sustaining significant damage, you could also face a liability lawsuit if the other party is injured. If you don’t have New Hampshire snowmobile insurance, the costs of legal defense and the settlement must come out of your own pocket. On the other hand, if you have snowmobile coverage, the injured party has the right to make a liability claim with your insurance company. Even if that doesn’t satisfy the injury you cause and you’re still taken to court, your insurance company will work to defend you.

New Hampshire Snowmobile Insurance Coverage Options

Possessing liability insurance is important, but the most crucial part of this coverage form is selecting the right coverage limit. If the injured party’s liability claim is for $2 million and you only have $500,000 in coverage, you’re responsible for the remaining amount. It can be a smart tactic to match your snowmobile liability limit to your auto insurance liability (if you have it) and your homeowners insurance liability limit. Snowmobile insurance can also insure multiple operators.

If you want more protection, ask your agent how much it would cost to add collision and comprehensive insurance. These policies could pay for your injuries and property damage during an accident as well as for theft and fire damage. In a state that doesn’t require insurance for operation, purchasing uninsured/underinsured motorist might be worth the investment. If you’re unsure of what coverage forms are right for your New Hampshire snowmobile insurance coverage, speak to your agent. Your member agent can help you analyze your unique needs and discover a policy that fits your snowmobile habits. 

To get the information and coverage that you need, contact an agent today.

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